Aus map - Federation of Australian Historical Societies Tasmanian Historical research Association Royal Historical Society of Queensland Royal Australian Historical Society Canberra & District Historical Society Royal Historical Society of Victoria History Trust of South Australia Historical Society of the Northern Territory Royal Western Australian Historical Society

 

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Heritage identification and protection

Guides

An excellent and detailed user-friendly book on how communities can identify, conserve and protect heritage places is Protecting local heritage places: A guide for communities published by the Australian Heritage Commission in 2000. You can download (using the above link) this or send an email to heritage@environment.gov.au requesting a copy or order a free copy from the Australian Heritage Council, ℅ Heritage Division, Department of the Environment and Water Resources, GPO Box 787 Canberra ACT 2601.

 

Another guide to assessing cultural significance, that explains the principles and concepts for modern conservation practice is The Burra Charter: The Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance 1999.It is published by Australia ICOMOS (the Australian national committee of the Paris-based International Council on Monuments and Sites). If you visit Australia ICOMOS and click on Charters and publications, then Burra Charter, you can order a copy of the Charter or read all about it. The Burra Charter can be applied to natural, indigenous and historical places with cultural heritage values. It has been adopted by all levels of Australian government as the standard tool for guiding conservation work and underlies most heritage registers and/or inventories.

 

To assist people making decisions on the future of places with natural heritage significance theAustralian natural heritage charter published by the Australian Heritage Commission for IUCN in 1966, revised and updated in 2002, is very useful. The Charter can be applied to public and privately owned places, to terrestrial, marine or freshwater areas, and to protected and unprotected areas. It can be viewed or downloaded (using the above link), or write requesting copy from either the Australian Heritage Council, ℅ Heritage Division, Department of the Environment and Water Resources, GPO Box 787 Canberra ACT 2601, or the Australian Committee for IUCN (World Conservation Union), GPO Box 528, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 2001. 

 

Complementing the charter is the Natural heritage places handbook, which expands on the principles in the Charter and explains the processes for conserving natural heritage places. Also provided are practical examples of how to apply the Charter. This 2003 revised handbook can be viewed or downloaded (using the above link) or write requesting copy from either the Australian Heritage Council, GPO Box 787, Canberra ACT 2601, or Australian Committee for IUCN (World Conservation Union), GPO Box 528, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 2001.

 

Ask first: A guide to respecting Indigenous heritage places and values published by the Australian Heritage Commission in 2002 complements other heritage guidelines including the Burra Charter and the Australian Natural Heritage Charter. It is designed to help developers, planners, researchers and managers identify and address Indigenous heritage issues. You can download this guide (using the above link), or write requesting copy from the Australian Heritage Council, GPO Box 787, Canberra ACT 2601.

 

Another useful book available from the Australian Heritage Council is Successful tourism at heritage places: A guide for tourism operators heritage managers and communities. This was a joint project between the Australian Heritage Commission, the Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Tourism and the Tourism Council Australia. Published in 2001, this guide helps those who need to understand the issues involved in planning for and managing tourism at heritage places. It provides information on:

The Australian Heritage Council has many publications, many of them downloadable.

 

The Federation of Australian Historical Societies (FAHS) was established in 1977, has eight constituent members, one in each state and territory, and is the national peak body representing the interests of about 1,000 historical societies and approximately 100,000 members throughout Australia. Apart from its guide to heritage identification and protection (which you are now reading), the FAHS has produced a variety of guides and training materials to assist historical societies, such as its guide to heritage tourism (published in 2008), and how to publish historical materials (published in 2006), and other subjects of interest to historical societies. These guides can all be accessed by using the "Support" and "Guidance and training" menus at the top of this web page.